All posts tagged: interior design

Tile with Spark: 10 Sources for Bold and Modern Tile

A big hello from somewhere up in the sky over the middle of continental U.S.! I’m headed to California to visit two of my bestest friends and I can’t wait. Even though the reason for the trip is principally work-related, I’m taking a few days on each side of the work to spend time with my friends and to also do a little work on the house. I love a good renovation and I love all the creativity, I really do, but there seems to come a point in each renovation when I’m a bit worn out, when decisions don’t come as easily, and my to-do list just seems to spiral out of control. The chance to escape the cold (and craziness) of home/work in Boston and be productive in a warmer (and quieter) climate is something I’m really looking forward to. The big item on my house to-do list right now is the tile. I’ve been searching high and low for the “right” tile for weeks now and, due to an abundance of options and a little fear of …

A photographic rewind: before the demolition

So sometimes I like to do things backwards (read: life is too hectic to think far enough in advance to allow me to do things in the proper order). So today, by popular demand, I’m sharing some pictures of the house from before the demolition. Yeah, I know, the “before” pictures should really precede the demolition and construction pictures, but that’s just not how it happened here. So, in no particular order, here are some of the photos from the real estate listing. It’s worth noting that the house was in perfectly liveable condition, and it’s only because of our aesthetic priorities, our interest in energy efficiency, and a desire to create a space better suited to our family needs that we are gutting the house and building the interior from scratch. Starting at the property’s front door, above is the entry hall or foyer, which in many respects is quite beautiful. But since it’s definitely not my style, we’re saying goodbye to the dark wood and will see it replaced with simple painted plastered walls, modern casework (cabinetry), …

Dressing up your sofa (or table, or chair, or…)

Right now we are smack in the middle of a year-long spell of temporary living, somewhere between the designed-it-myself happiness of our old loft in the city and the excitement of a big, new house in the quasi suburbs. We’re in an apartment, decently sized for city-living standards, and located in an awesome neighborhood we knew nothing about, but at the end of the day, it just doesn’t feel like home. I’ve spent some time trying to fix that, adding curtains here and there, making sure all our artwork is on the wall, insisting on using our rugs even when rooms have carpet (much to my partner’s chagrin)… and little by little we are creating a space that feels less like a hold-over and more like an enjoyable space. But between you and me, if you care at all about design, living in a temporary space isn’t really all that appealing. It’s frustrating because the spaces aren’t designed the way I would like them to be, there’s no overhead lighting, the walls are this bizarre almost-but-not-quite …

More than just a mattress

When we sold our house we received one of the best compliments that a design-crazy homeowner can ever hope to receive. The buyer’s agent said “the buyers really like your house as it is, and feel like they could move in today and not have to change a thing. Would you be interested in selling your furniture and decor?” Now most of the pieces we want to come with us — most particularly the live-edge walnut dining room table and steel-topped walnut bar my brother built — but we were certainly open to passing along some of our other pieces, and particularly those that are harder to move. One piece that we’ve agreed to sell to the buyer is our bed, The W Hotels Clive Bed, which we love. It’s really solid, great for sleeping and reading, and is such a nice example of understated contemporary furniture. So now I’m on a hunt for a new bed and I wanted to share the beds that are on my shortlist. To set some design parameters, let …